Accolades

Stanford Graduate School of Business
Maternova
Bloomberg Businessweek
Women Deliver Top 50 Idea
Cartier Women's Initiative Awards Finalist

Latest from our Blog

Subscribe via RSS
obstetric measure | SFH | fundal height | antenatal care
March 04, 2015

We are happy to announce a new partnership with a creative U.S. based team-- the folks at Mommy Measure. Mommy Measure uses the concept of fundal height as a way to empower pregnant women in the U.S. to track one of the parameters of pregnancy-- the growing belly!

Maternova has been working with Mommy Measure to translate this device into a variation useful for antenatal care settings in lower resource settings. The obstetric measuring tape can be used by midwives to identify pregnancies that may be at higher risk.

Though not a perfect measure, the symphysis-fundal height can be used to complement other methods of tracking pregnancies. Particularly useful in the second half of pregnancy, the fundal height measures, in centimeters, the length/height from the top of the woman's public bone to the top of the uterus. This measurement actually correlates with the weeks of gestation. Thus a measurement of 22 cm is approximately indicative of a normal pregnancy at 22 weeks (plus or minus).

The fundal height measurement, according to the literature, is most useful in terms of tracking a pregnancy over time-- does the height continue to increase every two weeks and correlate with the gestational age? If dramatically off, it MAY signify a problem that needs further exploration. For example, if the fundal height were dramatically lower than expected, it might signify intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and a risk of a low birth weight baby, for which...

default tag
January 22, 2015

Knowing the electricity challenges in our rural communities, women in labor and the midwives finds it very difficult during delivery of the newborn.

Its been a trend that pregnant mothers are mandated to buy “Candles” as part of the listed items for delivery. The candle of course provides light in case labor comes at night. Where the mother is not able to buy the candle, the local lights known as “npanaka” used mainly by rural dwellers which produces dangerous fumes that causes carbon monoxide poisoning are regularly used. This local lights is known to be very dangerous to the health of the newborn , mother and health worker.

My fellow midwives and I have conducted many deliveries at night using all these which has many times engendered our health in the course of saving lives. we have complained and no one listened to us. You can imaging a health worker with history of asthma working with the candle and local lights? your guess is as good as mine.

As young minds we have searched and decided to create and look out for innovations that can remedy this situation, and has eventually found one.

We came across this noble innovation that replaces the suffering of health workers , mothers and newborn. Today we have a SOLAR CLIP DELIVERY LIGHTS with Visors. In partnership with our very own “Maternova” an organization that is using technologies to improve women health across the world.

We have...

default tag
December 01, 2014

At Maternova, we consider ourselves incredibly lucky to have partners located around the world. Its these fearless entrepreneurs and philanthropists who make what we do so worthwhile, and in some cases possible. One of our favorite groups is Channel Initiative. Founded by Dominique Vidale-Plaza, they are shaking things up in the DRC and empowering women and children with sustainable healthcare. Not only is this incredibly brave, its desperately needed. Many medical clinics are days apart for foot travelers.

We wanted to see if our friends at Channel Initiative had an update for us on how they are progressing. This will be a two part series with todays entry covering both the needs of this vulnerable population along with some of the lessons Dominique and team have learned along the way. Enjoy!

Part 2 -- Lessons Learned and Moving forward

Lessons don’t ever stop in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and in most countries like it. They’re every day and sometimes every hour. Continuing to work with Panzi Hospital and Channel Initiative has brought many, many other opportunities for lessons and for coming to a place of deeper understanding on the complex needs of women and girls in the rural and under-served areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

It is obvious that there is a glaring need for health services in communities like these, that can ensure care to women and girls when they need it the most, when they are giving birth, when they have...

default tag
November 10, 2014

Maternova is a women-owned, women-run, for-profit social enterprise founded by Allyson Cote and Meg Wirth, currently based in Providence, RI. The company uses its online marketplace, established in 2011, to sell innovative technologies directly to those who can use them to save the lives of mothers and infants in developing countries around the world.
Below, Allyson Cote discusses her company’s aspirations and business model, and the emerging competitive landscape in global health care products.

Kyle Poplin: Briefly describe what Maternova does and the global health problems it's solving.

Allyson Cote: Maternova Inc. is the scrappy upstart rockstar of the global public health world. We exist for one core reason: to ensure the medical innovations that will save women’s and newborn lives actually get into the hands of the caregivers. Annually, over 350,000 women and 2 million newborns die from complications at childbirth. My partner Meg and I think not only is that unacceptable, but it’s preventable. There is an enormous gap in the distribution chain surrounding low-cost, disruptive technologies. Entrepreneurs and inventors who create brilliant, sustainable solutions often see their work die on the vine. The path to commercialization for any new product can be complicated and lengthy. We offer a clear path for novel technologies to gain market share and recognition via the Maternova brand.

KP: Maternova has been described as "an Amazon-type...

default tag
November 10, 2014

Maternova is a women-owned, women-run, for-profit social enterprise founded by Allyson Cote and Meg Wirth, currently based in Providence, RI. The company uses its online marketplace, established in 2011, to sell innovative technologies directly to those who can use them to save the lives of mothers and infants in developing countries around the world.
Below, Allyson Cote discusses her company’s aspirations and business model, and the emerging competitive landscape in global health care products.

Kyle Poplin: Briefly describe what Maternova does and the global health problems it's solving.

Allyson Cote: Maternova Inc. is the scrappy upstart rockstar of the global public health world. We exist for one core reason: to ensure the medical innovations that will save women’s and newborn lives actually get into the hands of the caregivers. Annually, over 350,000 women and 2 million newborns die from complications at childbirth. My partner Meg and I think not only is that unacceptable, but it’s preventable. There is an enormous gap in the distribution chain surrounding low-cost, disruptive technologies. Entrepreneurs and inventors who create brilliant, sustainable solutions often see their work die on the vine. The path to commercialization for any new product can be complicated and lengthy. We offer a clear path for novel technologies to gain market share and recognition via the Maternova brand.

KP: Matnernova has been described as "an Amazon-type...

Dumont CBT method Mali Benin
September 21, 2014

The power of social media powers much of what we do at Maternova. Our Twitter presence with our three handles, @maternova, @Mtnva_Research and @maternovaCBT, has allowed us to connect with midwives, global health experts, social activists and dedicated bloggers from around the world. The same network linked us to work in Benin, Mali and Vietnam on our favorite DIY method.

Recently our team has dedicated itself (among a number of other things) to spreading information about the condom balloon tamponade (CBT) method developed by Dr. Akhter and her team. A low-cost method for low-resource settings, the intrauterine condom balloon tamponade uses a condom, a catheter, a suture and IV fluids (and sometimes just sterile water) to create a balloon which can help prevent and stop post-partum hemorrhage, a condition where the mother bleeds excessively after birth, and is a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide.

In our search for research that supports the effectiveness of this method, we were able to find an ongoing study called [Evaluation of intrauterine balloon tamponade efficacy with Condom catheter in the severe PostPartum Hemorrhage management in Benin and Mali] (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN01202389/) through one of our Twitter connections. We should mention that having @maternovaCBT run by a French and Flemish speaker...

PACE MD | obstetric first aid | women's health
August 11, 2014

We have been following PACE-MD with great interest for years now. They focus on Obstetrical First Responders as the first link in the chain of survival in Mexico. We have long believed that the analogy to an EMT might be a better way to get beyond the long-standing disputes over what traditional birth attendants versus midwives versus others, including community health workers, can handle as far as maternal health emergencies. PACE-MD focuses on handling obstetric emergencies starting at the first contact with a health worker.

Through this successful model of community oriented, manikin based simulation, mnemonics (¨ABCs¨), and competency based certified SKILLS courses, PACE has trained and certified almost 20,000 health providers in various emergency conditions. Let us repeat: 20,000 health workers. This includes over 8,000 health providers in emergency obstetrics (through the Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics program-- ALSO) in underserved urban and rural communities throughout Mexico. What we like about this model is that it builds on the health providers who are already working on the frontlines, honing skills and building capacity to respond to obstetric and neonatal emergencies. PACE MD’s workshops in Mexico include Vacuum Assisted Delivery, “FAST OB” Ultrasound and Neonatal Resuscitation, and other basic and advanced surgical workshops. ALSO training finishes with a “Mega Delivery” Stress Test, something that every midwife, obstetrician and...