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We often do not think about what we cannot see, but in some cases we do not think about what we can see, and more importantly WHY we can see – power. It is no secret that the world is unequal. Most people are aware of at least some of these inequalities; for instance, almost everyone knows that the global burden of disease falls harder in Sub-Saharan Africa than Western Europe. Some inequalities, however, are less obvious and less discussed. Access to power is trivial in most developed countries, yet remains a major barrier to development in many impoverished nations.
An essential component of working in the maternal and neonatal health field is staying up to date on the rapidly evolving research. We do this through a variety of outlets; social media is a vital tool, and press releases or news stories are always useful sources. Another way for us to stay informed is by attending talks by experts in the field. This is how we found out about recent research on the adverse birth outcomes of ARV use during pregnancy.
As healthcare professionals, thought leaders, and innovators converge on Copenhagen, Denmark for 'Women Deliver', the team at Maternova honor all the work done by champions for women globally. We want to reflect back on a year of accomplishment and success for those who work tirelessly to provide women a better world. This past year has seen many triumphs including a reduction in maternal mortality in many key countries. But, we can’t overlook the preponderance of evidence that suggests we can still do so much better. And it is in that spirit, and solemn remembrance that we offer this piece.
***3D printing of prosthetics: a social enterprise in Vietnam** Persons with disabilities are the world’s largest minority, representing 15% of the global population. 80% of this population live in developing countries. We report on a creative approach to the new 3D printing craze-- and its application in personalized prosthetics in Vietnam.
Nobody needs convincing of the huge impact of HIV in our world today. While the prevalence of HIV differs vastly by region of the world, it still touches nearly every corner of the earth and has caused devastation throughout the span of its pandemic. There are an estimated 35 million people living with HIV today, and while the number of mortalities per year has fallen in recent years, it remains above one million. While these numbers are difficult to see, they are unlikely a surprise to most. The HIV pandemic is one of the most researched, targeted, and widely discussed. Much less discussed is the interaction HIV can have with other infectious diseases, and how coinfection can amplify the effects of disease.
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