The Latest from our Blog

Yaari, shoulder dystocia, obstructed labor
April 02, 2014

Shoulder dystocia is form of obstructed labor. Most obstetricians and midwives will tell you that this problem strikes a bit of dread in teams attending a birth. Fortunately there are a series of clever maneuvers that can often help release a newborn's shoulder from behind the mother's pubic bone. However, in some cases the maneuvers themselves can be dangerous and in other cases they may not work. Dr. Abraham Yaari is a very experienced obstetrician (from Israel but working in the U.S. for deacdes) who has had his share of difficult deliveries. He became increasingly concerned over the last decade as babies have gotten bigger, making the risk of 'shoulder dystocia' higher.

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March 19, 2014

She walks, barefooted, mile and miles to find water. She carries babies on her back and both hips. On her head is a basket. Her life is poor, hard, and often violent. Her babies die of diseases due to dirty water. There is war, civil war, and HIV, and TB, and malaria. She does not smile, she does not have hope.

anemia | pregnant women | pregnancy | iron deficiency
March 04, 2014

Those who read our blog know that we are very focused on anemia-- and for good reason (we think). Despite increasing efforts to diagnose and treat anemia worldwide, anemia affects 28% of the global population. And for the specific populations of greatest interest to the Maternova team, anemia is of tremendous relevance-- affecting as much as 42% of pregnant women and 47% of preschool aged children internationally.

But did you know that diagnosing anemia in pregnancy requires some additional information and different cutoff points? Did you know that there are trimester specific cutoff rates for anemia? Read on!

Anemia is accompanied by symptoms including weakness, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and

ORS | diarrhea | calcutta kids | child mortality | rehydration
February 24, 2014

In the video, the Haitian child was listless: his eyes were sunken and his shriveled body was limp. His mouth curled, turtle-like, to prepare to cry, but no tears came. A gloved hand, arm hairs poking out, reached for the skin around the child’s abdomen. The hand of the clinician pulled gathered skin to form a sinusoid mound. Then, instead of snapping into place as skin normally does, the mound slowly melted back like silly putty. The words “SKIN PINCH” scrolled across the bottom of the video.

misoprostol | Life for African Mothers | postpartum hemorrhage
February 07, 2014

This is a short story about Life for African Mothers connecting the dots-- for compassionate providers and women in the lowest resource countries.

When we first spoke to Angela Gorman of Life for African Mothers we were really intrigued by her model and inspired commitment to women globally. First, like Maternova, she was interested in connecting Product A to Point B. She realized that women were dying, thousands each day, for lack of a tiny pill that costs just 30 cents.That pill? misoprostol. With bureaucracy and counterfeiters making it nearly impossible to obtain locally, Angela devised a brilliant plan to carry in this lifesaving medicine in person.

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